A day of photography in Algonquin Park on Thanksgiving weekend

I went up to my friends Clint’s cottage in Bancroft with his family for Thanksgiving weekend. On Sunday morning, Clint and I headed up to Algonquin Park for a day of photography. We where rewarded with some fantastic weather and wildlife. There was a heavy frost in the morning, which made for some nice photographs. Later in the morning we found some people canoeing in the morning fog. Thanksgiving wouldn’t be complete without a nice turkey. This turkey wasn’t on our plates, but on the side of the road on the Highway 60 corridor. We had really been hoping to find a nice bull moose, which we didn’t find. We did find a nice cow and calf hidden amongst the tamaracks along Opeongo Road. They where only visible in a clearing for a brief second along for a photo or two before disappearing into the dark woods. It was a fantastic day of hiking and photography. I can’t wait to get back to the park.

Frosty Fall morning in Algonquin Park (copyright Stewart Stick)

Canoe in the fog in Algonquin Park (copyright Stewart Stick)

Canoe in the fog in Algonquin Park (copyright Stewart Stick)

Moose in Algonquin Park (copyright Stewart Stick)

Frosty Fall morning in Algonquin Park (copyright Stewart Stick)

Spring Amphibians

Spring is the best time of year to get out and photograph amphibians. During the first warm rains of spring, the frogs and salamanders emerge and travel to their breeding pools. Driving along country roads, you can observe hundreds of amphibians crossing the roads.

Spotted Salamander (Ambystoma maculatum)

1. Spotted Salamander (Ambystoma maculatum), sitting next to the overspray of paint from the yellow line running down the middle of the road.

Eastern Newt (Notophthalmus viridescens)

2. Eastern Newt (Notophthalmus viridescens) in its terrestrial juvenile form, known as a Red Eft.

Spring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer)

3. Spring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer)

Grey Tree Frog (Hyla versicolor)

Grey Tree Frog (Hyla versicolor)

4 & 5. Grey Tree Frog (Hyla versicolor)